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 Table of Contents  
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 35  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 73-74

Disruptive innovation in Japanese medical education: Positive transformation to blended online and on-site clinical clerkship after coronavirus disease 2019


Chiba University School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan, Kiyoshi Shikino, MD, PhD, MHPE, FACP, Department of General Medicine, Chiba University Hospital, Chiba, Japan

Date of Submission04-Oct-2020
Date of Decision30-Nov-2022
Date of Acceptance05-Dec-2022
Date of Web Publication12-Jan-2023

Correspondence Address:
MD Ayaka Takahara
Chiba University School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan, 1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba Pref
Japan
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/efh.efh_482_20

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How to cite this article:
Takahara A, Shikino K. Disruptive innovation in Japanese medical education: Positive transformation to blended online and on-site clinical clerkship after coronavirus disease 2019. Educ Health 2022;35:73-4

How to cite this URL:
Takahara A, Shikino K. Disruptive innovation in Japanese medical education: Positive transformation to blended online and on-site clinical clerkship after coronavirus disease 2019. Educ Health [serial online] 2022 [cited 2023 Jan 29];35:73-4. Available from: https://educationforhealth.net//text.asp?2022/35/2/73/367618



Dear Editor,

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused significant changes in the system of medical education in Japan, particularly in clinical clerkship practice. Before the pandemic, there was no online clinical clerkship, and all activities were conducted on-site. Because the pandemic suddenly made on-site training difficult, there is a lack of adequate educational resources on the online, including time and material, to prepare content that can complement the conventional curriculum for clinical clerkship, with all clinical educators struggling to adapt. Considering this situation, this letter examines the benefits of online clinical clerkship in Japan.

In the field of medicine, dramatic innovation is difficult,[1] and education is often organized under the traditional apprenticeship system. Due to the lack of educational consideration for the tasks given to learners,[2] under the on-site practice, students often just observed the treatment performed by doctors and had few opportunities to think thoroughly about and actively participate in patient treatment and management. Moreover, discussion took place in the presence of the supervising physician, which affected student interaction. In this context, online clinical clerkship has suddenly advanced to an education based on legitimate peripheral participation,[1] where tasks are presented according to learners' requirements or development, with plentiful opportunities for discussion.

Online clinical clerkship has promoted collaborative learning and brought numerous improvements.[3] First, learners are able to suggest treatments and gain a sense of engaging in the practice. The online environment makes it easier for students to express their opinions, especially for those who are not good at speaking up on-site or who need more time to think. Therefore, it is expected that clinical learning will increase as every student will be able to study independently. Second, through discussion, students can observe their colleagues' progress. This can increase their motivation, helping them learn how to teach and obtain skills necessary for lifelong learning and teamwork.

In the post-COVID-19 era, clinical practice at the bedside is expected to resume, although it will never be the same. As some procedures can be learned only at the bedside, they must be learned on-site. However, students can retain a sense of engaging in the practice and learn more efficiently by engaging in discussions about patients and lectures online. We hope that the introduction of such “new-normal” blended online and on-site clinical clerkship will lead to disruptive innovation in medical education.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Christensen CM, Grossman JH, Hwang J. The innovator's Prescription: A Disruptive Solution for Health Care. New York: McGraw Hill; 2009.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Lave J, Wenger E. Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation. Cambridge, NY: Cambridge University Press; 1991.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Ross MT, Cameron HS. Peer assisted learning: A planning and implementation framework: AMEE Guide no. 30. Med Teach 2007;29:527-45.  Back to cited text no. 3
    




 

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